The Rougarou or Loup Garou (Loup is French for wolf, and garou -from Frankish garulf, cognate with English werewolf- is a man who transforms into an animal.

The Rougarou or Loup Garou (Loup is French for wolf, and garou -from Frankish garulf, cognate with English werewolf- is a man who transforms into an animal.

wintherharlekin: “ Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway) Pictures: Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer Fossegrimen by...

wintherharlekin: “ Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway) Pictures: Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer Fossegrimen by...

mamuna, beast, slavic, slavic mythology, slavic folklore, concept art, creature design,

mamuna, beast, slavic, slavic mythology, slavic folklore, concept art, creature design,

Nordic folklore

Nordic folklore

#cementary #hag #baba #cmentarna #slavic #culture #folklore #legends

#cementary #hag #baba #cmentarna #slavic #culture #folklore #legends

wintherharlekin: “ Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway) Pictures: Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer Fossegrimen...

wintherharlekin: “ Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway) Pictures: Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer Fossegrimen...

Slav Mythology (a small part of it)

Slav Mythology (a small part of it)

Draugen was originally a dead person, an old man, whether he lived in the heap (the Norse called haugbúi) or set out to haunt the living. In recent folklore, it was customary to limit the shape of a ghost of a dead fish that had driven the sea, and that was not buried in consecrated ground. It was said that he wore leather right, but had a tang vase to head, sailed in a half boat with ripped sails and alerted death for those who saw him or even wanted to pull them down

Draugen was originally a dead person, an old man, whether he lived in the heap (the Norse called haugbúi) or set out to haunt the living. In recent folklore, it was customary to limit the shape of a ghost of a dead fish that had driven the sea, and that was not buried in consecrated ground. It was said that he wore leather right, but had a tang vase to head, sailed in a half boat with ripped sails and alerted death for those who saw him or even wanted to pull them down

In Finnish folklore, Ajatar (also known as Ajattara or Ajattaro) is an evil female spirit of the forest, “the devil of the woods”. She has many forms and depending on the description, she’s said to be a witch, a ghost, a snake or a dragon. Ajatar spreads diseases and plague and anyone who looks at her becomes sick. It was believed that Ajatar was the reason why people got lost in the woods and her name is probably derived from the Finnish word ajattaa; ‘to lead’, ‘to pursue’.

In Finnish folklore, Ajatar (also known as Ajattara or Ajattaro) is an evil female spirit of the forest, “the devil of the woods”. She has many forms and depending on the description, she’s said to be a witch, a ghost, a snake or a dragon. Ajatar spreads diseases and plague and anyone who looks at her becomes sick. It was believed that Ajatar was the reason why people got lost in the woods and her name is probably derived from the Finnish word ajattaa; ‘to lead’, ‘to pursue’.

Jewish folklore - Pinned by The Mystic's Emporium on Etsy

Jewish folklore - Pinned by The Mystic's Emporium on Etsy

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