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cat skeleton

cat skeleton

John Sloan (American, 1871–1951). The Shell of Hell!, 1939. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Ernest Shapiro and Family, 1995 (1995.411.155) #Halloween

John Sloan (American, 1871–1951). The Shell of Hell!, 1939. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Ernest Shapiro and Family, 1995 (1995.411.155) #Halloween

Skull in a Jar, Human Skull in Hand Blown Glass by kiva ford

Miniature Skull in a Jar, Human Skull in Hand Blown Glass

Skull in a Jar, Human Skull in Hand Blown Glass by kiva ford

Battista Franco  (Italian, ca. 1510–1561). Skull in Profile, ca. 1538. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.326)  #skull #Halloween

Battista Franco (Italian, ca. 1510–1561). Skull in Profile, ca. 1538. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.326) #skull #Halloween

Craniometer. This instrument was used for measuring the external dimensions of…

Craniometer. This instrument was used for measuring the external dimensions of…

Spider Monkey Skeleton

Spider Monkey Skeleton

Movement by Isaac Penard (Swiss, 1619-1676). Watch in the form of a skull, ca. 1640-50. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.1575) #skull #Halloween

Movement by Isaac Penard (Swiss, 1619-1676). Watch in the form of a skull, ca. 1640-50. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.1575) #skull #Halloween

Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head, ca. 1500–1525. Made in North France or South Netherlands. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.305) | Here, the striking terminal bead announces the constant proximity of death by joining a skull to the pair of vivacious lovers. Such an image is known as a memento mori (reminder of death), as it encourages one to reflect on the transience of life. #skeleton

Rosary Terminal Bead with Lovers and Death's Head, ca. 1500–1525. Made in North France or South Netherlands. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 (17.190.305) | Here, the striking terminal bead announces the constant proximity of death by joining a skull to the pair of vivacious lovers. Such an image is known as a memento mori (reminder of death), as it encourages one to reflect on the transience of life. #skeleton

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