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Røsslyngdrakt

Røsslyngdrakt

NORWAY: The traditional folk costume of Norway, called Bunad. Nowadays, it is commonly worn on Norway’s Constitution day (May 17). The specifics of design may also vary, shown here is a couple from the Telemark region circa 1880-1890s.

NORWAY: The traditional folk costume of Norway, called Bunad. Nowadays, it is commonly worn on Norway’s Constitution day (May 17). The specifics of design may also vary, shown here is a couple from the Telemark region circa 1880-1890s.

Traditional costume (bunad in Norwegian) from the Hardangerfjord region in Norway. Just love the details

Traditional costume (bunad in Norwegian) from the Hardangerfjord region in Norway. Just love the details

This is the Oslo Bunader, where my grandmother's family was from.  My grandmother immigrated to the US in 1917 after being orphaned twice.  While in Norway this winter, I visited the shop where these bunads are made and purchased some of the sølje (silver) for the Oslo bunader.  I hope to return within the next two years to purchase the dress, blouse, and purse.    http://www.sov.no/Bilder/s264.jpg

This is the Oslo Bunader, where my grandmother's family was from. My grandmother immigrated to the US in 1917 after being orphaned twice. While in Norway this winter, I visited the shop where these bunads are made and purchased some of the sølje (silver) for the Oslo bunader. I hope to return within the next two years to purchase the dress, blouse, and purse. http://www.sov.no/Bilder/s264.jpg

The traditional costume of Norway is called “bunad.” There are about 200 different types, each one representing a different part of the country. The word “bunad” really covers two different types of dress: The first is the traditional garb of a particular location (some of which can be traced back a long, long time – the ones used today usually represent the “fanciest”, holiday version of the dress) and a sort of “party dress” developed in the early 1900s during Norwegian national…

The traditional costume of Norway is called “bunad.” There are about 200 different types, each one representing a different part of the country. The word “bunad” really covers two different types of dress: The first is the traditional garb of a particular location (some of which can be traced back a long, long time – the ones used today usually represent the “fanciest”, holiday version of the dress) and a sort of “party dress” developed in the early 1900s during Norwegian national…

"Den nye Valdresbunaden (The new Valdres bunad" in black from Valdres, Oppland, Norway (It is also made in blue, but I haven't found a picture)

"Den nye Valdresbunaden (The new Valdres bunad" in black from Valdres, Oppland, Norway (It is also made in blue, but I haven't found a picture)

Svart Gloria - Trøndelag - Bunader - Norsk Flid nettbutikk og bunader

Svart Gloria - Trøndelag - Bunader - Norsk Flid nettbutikk og bunader

Bride from Hordaland. Photo by Solveig Lund. Norsk Folkemuseum

Bride from Hordaland. Photo by Solveig Lund. Norsk Folkemuseum

Beltestakk fra Bø i Telemark made by BunadRosen - Lovely blue! Very unique. ME WANT!!! <3

Beltestakk fra Bø i Telemark made by BunadRosen - Lovely blue! Very unique. ME WANT!!! <3

Bunad, Smykker, vev & rosemaling: Kvarde smøyg mønster

Bunad, Smykker, vev & rosemaling: Kvarde smøyg mønster

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